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music-society specialpack The Lower Rhythm Legacy VST

Very rare

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TLR- Armadillo

[Image: xInOfcal.png]

Like its big brother Rhinoceros, Armadillo is a colored
channel-strip-like utility. Designed to add weight and character
to your stock sounds, Armadillo comes equipped with a dual mode
lowpass / hipass filter (12dB/oct and 24dB/oct), variable tube
saturation and variable channel voicing. Thick and greasy or
pristine and clean, Armadillo is bred to paint your input with
character.


The Controls...

F I L T E R

The filter is fairly straight forward. Cut, Resonance
(res), Hipass mode (H toggle) and 24dB/oct mode (24 toggle).
Additionally you can find the variable tube saturation mix
control nearby (SAT).

M A S T E R

Here you have the Voice and Out controls. Out, simply
put, is your output level (volume). Turning the Voice knob from
far left to far right alters the overall tone from cleaner /
sparklier (left) to warm, bassy and dark (right).
---------------
TLR- Basilisk

[Image: ZPTCHD5l.png]

Basilisk is a full stereo, two channel multiband 'vibe'
style effect geared towards electric piano, strings, pads and
guitars. The wet channel passes your signal through a 9-Band
Equalizer, each band being modulated at an independently set
rate with an adjustable waveform (4 choices). In addition, each
band has a knob for adjusting the bandwidth for its dedicated
center frequency. Next, your signal is fed into a stereo chorus
effect (5 selectable waveforms) capable of everything from
smooth flange to a glitchy blitter -- and for those more 'crusty'
moods, a very fat lowpass filter is right there in order to trim
off some of the highs.
All that's left is to mix and match your wet and dry
signals with two independent volume knobs in order to find that
perfect blend.


Using This Effect :

The theory here (and explanation for only 9 presets) is
that you kind of 'tune' Basilisk to whatever you're playing,
depending on what frequencies your instrument is frequenting.

(frequency... frequenting... brilliant).

For example, you're not going to really use a whole lot
of 16k modulation on something like a bass guitar. Typically what
I've done thus far is turn the DRY knob all the way down and get
a good, interesting WET signal going... and then turn the DRY up,
WET down a bit, etc. until everything is blended well. Although
the end result was intended to be a smooth, flowing sound... as
you may have noticed already, you can definitely dial in some
rather strange and harsh tones.

Here is what the signal flow 'looks' like:

DRY                        > Output
WET > EQ > Chorus > Filter > Output

*All of this is in stereo.


Controls:

.::Main Section::...............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------

The top portion of the controls...

DRY Knob : Dry output level.

WET Knob : We (effect) output level.

RATE Knobs : Controls modulation rates for labeled freq.

WIDTH Knobs : Widens (or narrows) the band width for labeled
                 frequency.


.::Chorus/Filter Section::......................................
----------------------------------------------------------------

The bottom right portion of the controls...

Note: This is only applied to the WET channel.

RATE : Chorus rate.
DEPTH : Chorus depth.
FDBK : Chorus feedback amount.
MIX : Mix control for chorus effect; hard left is off,
 hard right on.
WAVE : Chorus waveform (sine, saw, ramp, triangle,
 pulse).

*To the right of the WAVE knob there is a small
oscilliscope -- this reacts to the waveform you
                have selected for the chorus. Why? It's shiny.

CUT : Lowpass filter cutoff frequency.
RES : Lowpass filter resonance.
-------------------
TLR- D15_2

[Image: bcOpFavl.png]

The D15/2 is a stereo, vintage-style analogue drum
module (no samples!). It follows standard trigger placement and
is fully tunable -- this means that you can alter nearly every
possible
parameter that defines how the drum voices sound. With
a total
of 16 voices (including two kick paths), global and bass
drum
dedicated bit crushers (one of each), two mixed output
channels
including a tube emulation with pre / post gain as well
as a
master reverb, the D15/2 lends an uncommon level of control
and variation to
the analog drum concept.



NOTE: Under each voice section below you can find the MIDI note

trigger for each one.


The Master Section
----------------------------------------------

       The amplifier has two separate outputs: Clean and Tube.
The tube gain setup is pretty standard and works as follows:

line L >     > line L
PRE GAIN > TUBE > POST GAIN
line R >     > line R



       The PRE GAIN and POST GAIN are controlled by the PRE and
POST
knobs respectively. The "clean" output (doesn't utilizing
tube
emulation) is separate and is controlled by the CLEAN knob.


The bit crusher (adjusted with the CRUSH knob) and the reverb

apply to the tube emulated output only. The reverb is used by

setting the ROOM (room size) and RLVL (reverb level) knobs.



Note Triggers---------------------------------------------------



       Below is a list of the notes that trigger each drum
voice.

BD : C3
SN : D3, E3
HH : F#3 (closed), G#3, A#3 (open)
CB : G#4
RS : C#3
CP : D#3
CR : C#4
RD : D#4
LT : F3, G3, A3
MT : B3, C4
HT : D4
HC : D5
LC : E5
TM : F#4
CL : D#6


The Voices
------------------------------------------------------



       All voices come equipped with a stereo pan pot labeled,
you
guessed it: pan. The only only truly 'general' thing to say
here is that when trying to determine what a control actually
does, it's best to just listen to how it affects the sound. All
of these voices have different methods of being created and so
it would be difficult to explain the *exact* function of each
knob.



//BD (Bass Drum)
________________________________________________________________

The BD channel on the D-15/2 actually has two sounds that are

triggered, so you can get a "slap" as well as a "boom." It can

be hard to get a good, dynamic kick sound, so we thought two

heads are better than one -- pun perhaps intended.



!!WARNING!! This channel can produce A LOT of bass, and if used

haphazardly, it can definitely damage your speakers.



crush : dedicated bit crusher

vel : BD velocity (alters keypress velocity sensitivity)

vol : BD Voice A level

frq a : BD Voice A frequency

dcy : BD Voice A decay

volx : BD Voice X level

dcyx : BD Voice X decay

frqx : BD Voice X frequency

cut : filter cutoff (only affects BD Voice A)
c : this controls a quantizer that is attached to the BD

 waveshape of the same name

A, B, C : selects one of three different waveshapes for this

 channel


//SN (Snare Drum)

________________________________________________________________



vol : volume

vel : velocity (alters keypress velocity sensitivity)

frq : alters main snare frequency

dcy : snare decay length

cut a : frequency cutoff a

cut b : frequency cutoff b

res : filter resonance level

ton : tone adjustment





//HH (HiHat)
________________________________________________________________

As with other analog style drum machines, the HiHat has three

layers that are triggered with different MIDI notes. This

serves to represent closed hihat, open hihat and something

in between.



vol : volume

frq : alters main hat frequency

dcy a : primary decay

dcy b : decay for the (closed) hihat


//CB (Cow Bell)
________________________________________________________________


vol : volume

frq a : frequency a

frq b : frequency b

dcy : decay length



//RS (Rim Shot)
________________________________________________________________


vol : volume

vel : affects static velocity

frq a : main frequency

ton : alters tone


//CP (Clap)
________________________________________________________________


vol : volume

mod : decay modifier
cut : filter cutoff

res : filter resonance





//CR (Crash)
________________________________________________________________




vol : volume

frq : alters main frequency

cut : filter cutoff

res : filter resonance





//RD (Ride)
________________________________________________________________


vol : volume

frq a : alters main frequency

frq b : alters secondary frequency

cut : filter cutoff

res : filter resonance





//LT, MT, HT, HC and LC
________________________________________________________________




These five voices have identical controls. In the order above,

they are Low Tom, Middle Tom, High Tom, High Conga and Low
Conga.





vol : volume

frq a : alters main frequency

frq b : alters secondary frequency





//TM (Tamborine)
________________________________________________________________




vol : volume

frq : alters frequency

res : filter resonance

ton : tone modifier



//CL (Clave)


________________________________________________________________


vol : volume

frq : alters frequency
--------------
TLR- Dueling Tremelos

[Image: VtMppBxl.png]

 Dueling Tremolos is a phase-based tremolo effect that can be
used either with one or two engines; each of which has its own
rate, attack, release and volume, making for some very nifty
modulation combinations. In addition, engine B can be phase
inverted in order to differently interact with the rest of the
wet signal!

Modulation Section
RATE : Speed of effect modulation
ATTACK : Attack timing of effect modulation
RELEASE : Release timing of effection modulation
LEVEL : Volume control for effect
1 : Turns the B engine on.
2 : Inverts the B engine.


Master Section
LEVEL : Master volume

Rather than modulating levels directly, DT uses phase inverted
versions of the dry signal in order to create sound
cancellation.
-----------
TLR- Dusk

[Image: Jusojmzl.png]

Dusk is a smooth, virtual analog lowpass filter with a
few extras; full stereo signal flow, a subtle tube-emulated
saturation, clean out and a modulation effect affectionately
named " the Wub." Intended to nearly always have some clean
in the mix, Dusk revitalizes your sounds rather than just simply
trimming the highs.


Using Dusk :

Dusk works pretty similarly to any other LP filter out
there. Using a 12dB/oct. filter, you get a smooth cutoff with
the ability for some nice resonance peaks. Blended with your
clean signal before the filter is a saturation channel that
uses the same tube emulation 'circuitry' found in some of our
other plugins, only tweaked to add anything from very little
to a good amount of color without becoming overly distorted.

With the addition of a clean out, you can get a really
nicely blended signal that, of course, has an emphasis on the
low frequencies.


A Warning About 'Res' :

Most of you using this will already know that if
tweaked... lets say... "haphazardly" you can produce some
pretty shitty feedback with the resonance control. It is up
to you to protect your speakers and ears -- I decided against
taming this feature simply because it would eliminate a lot
of the cool stuff you can do with it.


The Wub :

The 'Wub' was kind of a last minute addition that I
felt gave the filter a little character. Essentially what
you have is a copy of your signal being modulated via another
set of filters (in stereo as well) and then fed into the
master mix. It might remind some of you of a tremelo, but
there is some sweeping involved so it's... I dunno what it
is. A fun little wubbly thing, filled with childlike joy! It
actually sounds pretty cool on guitar.


The Controls :

CUT : filter cutoff
RES : filter resonance
SAT : saturation mix
CLEAN : clean signal
MSTR : master volume

[wub] : Turns 'the Wub' (I love saying that) on and off

RATE : modulation rate
LVL : level of 'wub' effect

***Note: The little knob to the southwest of the CUT knob is
a volume booster for the cut channel to make up for some of
what is might be lost when not using much Clean.
----------------
TLR- Earthworm

[Image: XEt4DHyl.png]

Earthworm is a bass synthesizer with all of the grease,
fatness and power expected of an analog-style machine. Features
include two oscillators (five waveforms each), an extra fat LP
filter and variable 'tone,' 'tube' drive and bit crushing. When
the soft sounds of other bass synths just aren't cutting it for
your IDM, glitch, industrial, etc... Earthworm will provide the
monophonic balls required right out of the box.


The Controls...

WAVE A Waveform selection (sine, saw, ramp, tri, pulse)

WAVE B Waveform selection (sine, saw, ramp, tri, pulse)

GLIDE Portamento

VOLUME Master level

TONE Opens and closes the pulse mod depth for
WAVE B, allowing WAVE A's output to modulate it

POWER Variable tube drive

CRUSH Variable bit crushing

CUT Cutoff value for the LP filter
----------------
TLR- Equivibe 2

[Image: VIjotOsl.png]

Equivibe 2 is a full stereo, two channel multiband 'vibe'
style effect geared towards electric piano, strings, pads and
guitars. The wet channel passes your signal through a 9-Band
Equalizer, each band being modulated at an independently set
rate with an adjustable waveform (4 choices). In addition, each
band has a knob for adjusting the bandwidth for its dedicated
center frequency. Next, your signal is fed into a stereo chorus
effect (5 selectable waveforms) capable of everything from
smooth flange to a glitchy blitter -- and for those more 'crusty'
moods, a very fat lowpass filter is right there in order to trim
off some of the highs.
All that's left is to mix and match your wet and dry
signals with two independent volume knobs in order to find that
perfect blend!


Using This Effect :

The theory here (and explanation for only 9 presets) is
that you kind of 'tune' Equivibe 2 to whatever you're playing,
depending on what frequencies your instrument is frequenting.

(frequency... frequenting... brilliant).

For example, you're not going to really use a whole lot
of 16k modulation on something like a bass guitar. Typically what
I've done thus far is turn the DRY knob all the way down and get
a good, interesting WET signal going... and then turn the DRY up,
WET down a bit, etc. until everything is blended well. Although
the end result was intended to be a smooth, flowing sound... as
you may have noticed already, you can definitely dial in some
rather strange and harsh tones.

Here is what the signal flow 'looks' like:

DRY                        > Output
WET > EQ > Chorus > Filter > Output

*All of this is in stereo.


Controls:

.::Main Section::...............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------

DRY Knob : Dry output level.

WET Knob : We (effect) output level.

RATE Knobs : Controls modulation rates for labeled freq.

WIDTH Knobs : Widens (or narrows) the band width for labeled
                 frequency.


.::Chorus/Filter Section::......................................
----------------------------------------------------------------

Note: This is only applied to the WET channel.

RATE : Chorus rate.
DEPTH : Chorus depth.
FDBK : Chorus feedback amount.
MIX : Mix control for chorus effect; hard left is off,
 hard right on.
WAVE : Chorus waveform (sine, saw, ramp, triangle,
 pulse).

*To the right of the WAVE knob there is a small
oscilliscope -- this reacts to the waveform you
                have selected for the chorus. Why? It's shiny.

CUT : Lowpass filter cutoff frequency.
RES : Lowpass filter resonance.
--------------
TLR- Explor3r Extended

[Image: XPqfuhhl.png]

Based on the synthesizer behind our 2009 KVR Audio
Developer's Challenge entry, Explor3r Extended is a three
oscillator monosynth with channel-dedicated amplitude envelopes,
lowpass filters and LFOs -- all glued together with a matrix that
allows both phase modulation and sync inputs on each oscillator
to be fed by the output of any other oscillator (including
itself).

After the main channels are done producing their sound,
it is fed into various texturizing pathways that offer everything
from 'tube' saturation to a noise channel w/high cut, ring mod,
global filtering & delay. Although absolutely designed to perform
as an analog-style monosynth, we've also included the option to
switch into a three-voice poly mode for those of you with a bit
more CPU headroom.

Explor3r Extended can create anything from fat, complex
leads to buzzy basses, droning sound effects, sweeping pads and
terrible, screeching chaos.


Sound Generation Section
________________________________________________________________
In this section you have the basic controls for your
oscillators; labeled below. From top to bottom, osc. 'strips'
are considered to be 1, 2 and 3 (for the purposes of utilizing
the modulation/sync matrix).

vol : osc. volume
wave : waveform selection (from left > right: sine, saw, ramp
 triangle, pulse)
tune : coarse tuning
pmd : phase modulation depth
attack : amplitude envelope attack
decay : amplitude envelope decay
sustain : amplitude envelope sustain
release : amplitude envelope release



Filter Section
________________________________________________________________
Each oscillator has its own lowpass filter, which is
found here.

cut : lowpass filter cutoff
res : lowpass filter resonance control



LFO Section
________________________________________________________________
Each oscillator has a dedicated LFO that can be sent
either to the pitch input or phase modulation input. These LFOs
are set as sine wave signals by default, but can be changed to
saw.

p/m : toggles signal to be sent to pitch (off) or phase mod
 input (on).
rate : LFO rate
depth : LFO depth
[saw] : Toggles between sine and saw wave for the LFO, sine
 being the off position.

Notes : It is important to remember that Depth only controls
 the actual output level of the particular LFO, while
 "pmd" controls how much the oscillator is allowing
 in.
Modulation/Sync Matrix Section
-------------
TLR- Filthpig

[Image: DZSAAqSl.png]

F I L T H P I G -- Mono / Poly Hybrid Synthesizer

Filthpig is a monstrous, six oscillator hybrid synthesizer with an extreme potential for tweakability. Geared towards drones, noise, sirens and circuit-bent style glitching, Filthpig employs two full, three oscillator synth sections -- one to produce sound and the other to act as a dedicated modulation source. Each section contains two tuning controls, a modulation depth knob, a waveform selector (five waveforms) and an amplitude envelope for each oscillator as well as a 3 x 3 modulation matrix that lets the output of  any oscillator modulate any other oscillator (including itself). These modulation matrices also contain sync switches, and the modulator part of the synth also links oscillator output to the pitch values for the sound-producing section. Although a monosynth at heart, Filthpig also has the ability to be switched into a three voice poly mode for added functionality and also has two cascaded filters (hicut and then locut) for tone shaping. Topping everything off, you have a DESTROY knob in the master section that turns up a decimation effect, and a master modulation effect (consisting of a delay and lowpass filter).

Whether you are an experimentalist, need gritty monosynth tones or just like crazy random crap, Filthpig is sure to crawl out of the garbage can and into your heart; where it will undoubtedly lay eggs and then die.


Understanding Filthpig Part 1. . . . .

Think of this synth in two parts -- top and bottom. The top half produces sound, while the bottom is completely dedicated to modulation. Whereas the top can modulate / sync to itself, the bottom can not only do this, but the output goes directly to modulating the top. Essentially it is two synthesizers in one with a lot of internal pathways, many of which are feedback loops.

To get into the meat of this synth, the first thing to do is identify each of the six oscillators as having a horizontal "strip" of buttons and knobs (labeled 1, 2 or 3). The controls (except the matrix stuff) are as follows:

FINE: Fine tunes the oscillator pitch.
LEVEL: Oscillator overall volume.
WAVE: Oscillator waveform (rotates from left (sine, saw, ramp, triangle, pulse) to right).
COARSE: Coarse tuning; tunes in defined steps.
PMD: Pulse Modulation Depth; a depth control for incoming signals.
ATTK: Amplitude envelope attack.
DEC: Amplitude envelope decay.
SUS: Amplitude envelope sustain.
REL: Amplitude envelope release.

As you have probably guessed or noticed, while MIDI signals trigger the synth's sound gate to open and close, you have a lot of tuning options. This is because Filthpig is designed to be a drone synth, yet operates in a software environment where MIDI is the standard way to trigger sounds.


Understanding Filthpig Part 2. . . . .

The biggest part of Filthpig's uniquely horrible personality are the matrix sections. The simpler matrix, belonging to the audible set of oscillators (top three) has two controls: MOD and S. Turning a MOD knob up raises the amount of oscillator output going into another oscillator. Switching S on syncs two oscillators together. These matrices work exactly like a times table in that, for example, to get oscillator three to modulate oscillator two, one would need to turn up the following knob:

1 [ ] [ ] [ ]
2 [ ] [ ] [ ]
3 [ ] [X] [ ]

The sync works exactly the same way. To get oscillator 2 to sync to itself, turn on the following S switch:

1 [ ] [ ] [ ]
2 [ ] [X] [ ]
3 [ ] [ ] [ ]

The lower matrix is a bit different -- the MOD and S controls do the exact same thing (the oscillators in the lower area affect each other), however there is the addition of a P switch and a DEPTH knob that act as gateways to the sound producing part of Filthpig. Turning the DEPTH knob up takes the output of a given oscillator and sends it to the modulation input of an oscillator from the top half of the synth. For example, to send the signal from both oscillators 1 and 3 to oscillator 1 from the top half, the bottom matrix DEPTH knobs appropriate would be this:

1 [X] [ ] [ ]
2 [ ] [ ] [ ]
3 [X] [ ] [ ]

The P switch simply sends a lower oscillator's output signal to the pitch input of an oscillator from the top half. If you wanted to link the output of the lower oscillator 2 to the upper oscillator 3's pitch input, you'd flip on the following P switch:

1 [ ] [ ] [ ]
2 [ ] [ ] [X]
3 [ ] [ ] [ ]


Master Section. . . . .

Containing only five knobs, the master section is pretty simple. The only real "trick" here is that instead of one multi-mode filter, there are two different filters to give a bit more ability to shave your sound to your liking. Using these two filters together, you can create a bandpass effect. Try moving their levels around on different sound settings, it might affect what you're hearing more than you'd guess.

HICUT: Cuts off frequencies above the knob setting,
LOCUT: Cuts off frequencies below the knob setting.
GLIDE: Portamento control.
MASTER: Master volume.
Poly Switch: Toggles on and off poly mode.
DESTROY: Decimates the signal with a non-rounded bit crushing effect.

Master Modulator Section. . . . .

Located just to the left of the FILTHPIG title graphic you'll see a toggle switch and a series of knobs.

MOD: Delay time.
FDBK: Delay feedback length.
CUT: Lowpass cutoff.
LEVEL: Volume.
ON (toggle): Turn this section on or off.


Filthpig In Practice. . . . .

Once you get the hang of this system of controls you'll start to see how a concentrated effort can be made to acquire certain sounds, and the messy web of internal wiring will start to make sense. Through careful tweaking and experimentation, Filthpig is capable of producing a rather large set of different drones. On any given setting, a single knob may mean the difference between casually annoying your listening audience and swelling their brains so that they start leaking out of their ears. Be patient and experiment!
----------------
TLR- Grotto

[Image: PYsKcu0l.png]

Grotto is a stereo reverb / delay hybrid that focuses on
producing lush, cave-like environments -- either as enhancements
to your source signal or as a sculpting tool for creating
droning ambiences. At it's core, Grotto's wet channel is driven
by emulated tubes that fill your reverb out with rich harmonics
before passing the signal along into a fat lowpass filter. On the
side, a delay scoops up signal from either the clean or wet path
and then seamlessly reenters the signal chain. Next, simply mix
and match your channels with a master, clean and wet volume knob.
In addition to Grotto's core features, we left it's spine
exposed, allowing you to alter parameters of the reverb algorithm
itself. This paves the way for a huge, custom reverb that you can
tailor to fit whatever you send through it.


The Controls :

This section will be laid out terms of the black boxes
on the interface (from left to right).

Box 1 -- The Delay

FEEDBACK : Delay feedback setting
LEVEL : Delay volume
ON / OFF : Turns delay on and off
CLEAN / FILTHY : Sets the source signal
[STAR] : Sets delay timing (host tempo synced)

***The other two knobs that are under the arrows represent the
delay repeat amounts for the left and right channels
respectively.

Box 2 -- Filter & Master Time

CUT : Filter cutoff frequency
RES : Filter resonance setting
DECAY : Sets the master time decay for the reverb

Box 3 -- Master Section

MASTER : Master volume
CLEAN : Clean out channel
DIRTY : Wet volume / gain. Like on an old school
 tube amp, your volume and gain are the same
 control. Turning this up will increase the
 harmonic saturation in the reverb.

Box 4 -- Sculpting Section

This is where you can tweak the parameters that control
how the reverb itself 'sounds.' The top row is your left channel
and the bottom is your right -- each in sequential order (one,
two, three, four). The idea is that your first will be shortest
and fourth longest. Think of it as two long hallways, each being
defined by four points. Turning these knobs moves those 'points'
and changes the way the hall sounds.

By keeping your left and right channels similar but
different, in theory you'll get a 'better' stereo image.

Feel free to really play with this section and listen to
how it affects the sound. When using Grotto to turn a synth line
into a drone-like ambience, I've found this section especially
useful for bringing out different parts of the sound and
supressing others.
--------------
TLR- Noizdumpster

[Image: foT6AeOl.png]

Noizdumpster is adept at creating glitchy, pulsating and
looping, siren-like drones. It functions via two operators, each
with a chain of three oscillators and two delay units that
affect the way the MIDI pitch signal is modulated. In addition,
each of the two operators have six toggle switches that connect
different parts of the operator together in order to produce
relatively unexpected results. Top it all off with a global low
pass filter and a completely variable bit crusher.


Controls:

The trick with Noizdumpster is to realize that the
controls are not set up to reflect exact signal flow. Wave A
does not necessarily come before Wav B. Part of using this tool
is to learn how it behaves intuitively; something that isn't
easily accomplished by attempting to break it down into an
exact blueprint. This is due to the fact that the innards are
wired rather chaotically.


.::Operators::.................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------


All items below are listed from left to right.

WVA : Waveform
FRQ : Pitch frequency mod (static / linear)
FDBK : Accompanying delay feedback
MOD : Accompanying delay modulation amount

WVB : Waveform
FDBK : Accompanying delay feedback
MOD : Accompanying delay modulation amount

WVC : Waveform


.::MSTR::......................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------

MSTR is the Master section. These controls globally
affect what you hear.

MASTER : Master output volume
KUT : Lowpass cutoff frequency
FUK : A condensed, fully variable bit crushing
                 effect
-------------------
TLR- Rhinoceros

[Image: 3XcPJtsl.png]

Rhinoceros is a rather colored channel-strip-like
utility designed to add weight and character to otherwise stale
sounds. With a full compressor, three band parametric EQ, dual
mode lowpass / hipass filter (12dB/oct and 24dB/oct), variable
tube saturation and variable channel voicing, Rhinoceros can
take your signal and add anything from subtle refinement to fat,
grizzly meat and more. Perfect for breathing life into sequenced
drums and DI'd electric bass guitar, or adding some excitement
to your string / pad section.


The Controls...

From left to right, the first section is the compressor,
which contains standard Threshold, Ratio, Attack, Release and
Gain knobs. Second in line is the parametric equalizer. As with
other parametric EQ's, you have variable frequency and gain
controls. Both of these sections may be bypassed via the switch
located on their bottom left sides.

*Keep in mind that the compressor can be used as a gain stage,
so turning it on or off may raise or lower the volume of your
signal.

The filter is next and fairly straight forward as well.
Cut, Resonance (res), Hipass mode (H toggle) and 24dB/oct mode
(24 toggle). Additionally you can find the variable tube
saturation mix control in this section, labeled Sat. This
section defines the 'sound' of this plugin and therefore a
bypass was not added.

Finally, in the master section you have the Voice and
Out controls. Out, simply put, is your output level (volume).
Turning the Voice knob from far left to far right alters the
overall tone from cleaner / sparklier (left) to warm, bassy
and dark (right).
---------------
TLR- Satyr

[Image: zWom2BAl.png]

Simply put, Satyr is a unique sounding experimental
synthesizer that is based around the idea of using your MIDI
pitch signals to modulate two Moog-style filters as white noise
is crammed through them. Each of these filters offer you up
seven different resonance settings that will alter the overall
sound differently based on which arrangement they're in. Throw
in optional channels of tube-style saturated drive and ring
modulation, with fat global lowpass filtering AND yet another
variable white / pink noise blend and you have... well, with
this one we're just going to say: try it and find out.


Using This Synth :

Overall Satyr is pretty simple. Use the Resonance
settings to articulate the two oscillators with each other,
then just blend in some drive, ringmod, noise in different
amounts until you've got what you want. The included presets
cover most of the basics, but due to the modulation capabilities
of this synth, there is plenty of more ground to cover. This is
especially true once you start explorer dissonance.


Controls
................................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------

Resonance Box: Each of these toggles represents a different
resonance setting for either of the oscillators -- the left
column for one, the right for the other.

Row 1: Master volume / envelope

Row 2: -Tube emulated drive/saturation
      -Ringmod level
      -Master Filter cutoff frequency
      -Master Filter resonance

Row 3: -White/pink noise level
      -White/pink noise filter cutoff frequency
----------------
TLR- Signals 2

[Image: JZgdEEcl.png]


Intended to create incredibly intricate and lush pad
sounds, Signals utilizes four oscillators (each with their own
signal path) in conjunction with two powerful LFOs (30 possible
destinations, 5 waveforms) and an LFO-modulated global
delay with filter cutoff. Each oscillator has its own waveform
selector (5 shapes), tuning control, lowpass filter, modulation
depth control and volume envelope. If you're looking for a synth
that can effortlessly mix warm, analog pads with celestial
modulation or grinding glitch *and* switch into mono mode to use
the same tone-shaping tools to meet another end, look no further.


Using This Synth :

The signal flow for Signals might look a bit like the
diagram below...


    LFO2
LFO1  /
 | /
osc1 -|   -
osc2 -|   -
osc3 -|   -  (mixed) output
osc4 -|   -
     |   -
   delay -


The theory here is to create variety within your osc.
paths in order to create a more complex sound. One cut, long
and low pitched... another high pitched with a fast attack, etc.
By sculpting these paths with their inherent controls as well as
the LFOs and then mixing them together at varying levels, you
can create a pretty huge array of different sounds.


Controls:

.::MOD 1::......................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------

The MOD 1 section consists of two LFO's with 32 options
of destination each. This section is used to color / modify the
oscillators in the GENERATION section.

All items below are listed from left to right.

SHAPE : LFO1 Wave Shape (8 choices)
RATE : LFO1 Rate
LVL : LFO1 Output Level
[button] : LFO1 Destination button

SHAPE : LFO2 Wave Shape (8 choices)
RATE : LFO2 Rate
LVL : LFO2 Output Level
[button] : LFO2 Destination button

*Destination buttons have 32 sequentially toggled targets, one
being an "off" setting. These are labeled with letters for easy
reference, however we have decided to not map the actual target
destinations in this manual in order to preserve the personality
of this synthesizer.


.::MSTR::......................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------

MSTR is the Master section. These controls globally
affect what you hear.

ATT : Volume Envelope Attack
DEC : Volume Envelope Decay
SUS : Volume Envelope Sustain
REL : Volume Envelope Release
CUT : Lowpass Filter Frequency Cutoff
RES : Lowpass Filter Resonance
GLD : Portamento
VOL : Master Volume

*Some interesting effects can be had by shortening the master
Release time, while keeping the release times of everything else
long. Your master release will cause the sound to fade out while
parts of the sound engine continue, so that when you trigger the
gate open again those continuing sound elements will still be
in play.


.::GENERATION::..................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------

This section contains your four oscillator channels,
each occupying the space of one row.

WAVE : Wave Shape
TUNE : Coarse Tuning
CUT : Lowpass Filter Frequency Cutoff
B-D : Bit Crusher Bit Depth
S-R : Bit Crusher Sample Rate
ATT : Volume Envelope Attack
DEC : Volume Envelope Decay
SUS : Volume Envelope Sustain
REL : Volume Envelope Release
VOL : Channel Volume
PMD : Modulation depth

*The PMD control effects the 'entry level' of anything being fed
into an oscillators phase mod input. In the case of Signals,
this would most often refer to the influence of an LFO in the
MOD 1 section (when on certain settings). Keep in mind that the
MOD 1 LFO's do not always feed into the phase mod input. In fact,
they have many settings that send the signal elsewhere, such as
a pitch input.


.::MOD 2::......................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------

This row houses the controls for your delay channel.
This channel takes the mixed output of your four oscillator
channels and processes them with delay. The output of this
channel is then mixed back in with your oscillator channels as
the signal moves into the Master section.

SHAPE : LFO Wave Shape (8 choices)
RATE : LFO Rate
[button] : LFO on/off
TIME : Delay Time
F-B : Delay Feedback
LVL : Channel Output Level
CUT : Cutoff frequency (lowpass)
---------------
TLR- Spread Eagle

[Image: CWCsD6fl.png]

A different breed of spacializer, Spread Eagle clones
your stereo input and gives you full pan, level, and filter
(low or high pass) control over three copies of the signal
before merging it back together into a stereo output. With an
additional toggle for phase inversion you can mix, match and
blend different sounding copies of your source to get that
perfect stereo field placement.


The Controls...

Labeled A, B and C, each section represents a cloned
stereo input. Switch from Low to high pass filtering (L or H),
toggle on phase inversion (Inv) or adjust the cutoff (cut),
resonance (res), pan or level (vol).

Trim or boost the output with the master control.
------------------
TLR- Thresher

[Image: Id1MiLNl.png]

Purely intended as an effect tool, Thresher is the
compressor your mother warned you about. Capable of obnoxious
sustain extension as well as distorted crushing, Thresher offers
itself up as a diverse toneshaping tool for those who are into
heavier or experimental music-making. Features a vintage style
compressor along with a clean output and a variable 'Power'
control that introduces tube style saturation and old school
filter fatness. Gently polish or obliterate: your choice!


The Controls...

THRSH compressor threshold
RATIO compressor ratio
ATTACK compressor attack
RELEASE compressor release
MUG make up gain / trim (for compressed channel)
POWER Variable saturation
CLEAN Clean level

Use like a normal compressor, crank up the Power to crush and
fatten. Smile
----------------
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Don´t forget to say Thank you


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